Friday

15 December 2017

gallery
Jan Fabre (born in Antwerp, Belgium, 1958) currently lives in Antwerp. Internationally recognised as one of today’s most innovative and versatile artists. For more than 25 years Fabre has been creating a distinct profile for himself as a ground-breaking performance artist, theatre and opera director, choreographer and visual artist.  Work by Jan Fabre has featured in major international exhibitions, including the Venice Biennale, Documenta in Kassel and the São Paolo Biennale. His recent presentations have included : Galerie Daniel Templon, Paris, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wien, Nuova Scuola Grande di Santa Maria della Misericordia, 54. Biennale di Venezia (2011).   I let myself drain (dwarf), 2007 steel, polyurethane foam, silicone, human hair, glass, textile, pump, filmblood and clothing 165 x 56 x 50 cm Courtesy of Guy Pieters Gallery, Belgium [Jovan Popović, Portrait of a Man with a Fez, 1845, oil on canvas, 110,5 x 87 cm, inv.no. NM 3167 Property of the National Museum, Belgrade] А life-size wax sculpture of a man, rammed into a painting made by a great Serbian artist. The sculpture is Fabre’s alter ego: an artist in the role of a martyr. Defeated by his ancestors, the alter eho accepts the fact that he will never be equal to the grand masters of the past, and will never experience their fame. Fabre’s piece points to painful element of Serbia’s institutional and cultural setting. The National Museum (which kindly allowed us to use the painting Jovan Popović Portrait of a Man with a Fez, oil on canvas, 1845, for the purpose of this exhibition) has been closed for almost a decade. This is a fact against which Fabre’s sculpture is “fighting”. I am a one-man movement (2011 - 2011) bic ink blue, unleaded crystal glass 4873 mm x  355 mm Photographer: Pat Verbruggen © Studio  Angelos Interpretations of this project can be read on many levels, but it is important to note that the piece was made in 1983 (the English version was created for the 52nd October Salon). An older and less famous piece corresponds to Fabre’s figure ready to dash forward. Perhaps this little runner, acting as a self-proclaimed revolutionary, will help launch a discussion on some of the essential issues plaguing the contemporary Serbian society. These issues need to be addressed publicly.
Friday, 14 October 2011
In the precarious situation that we are all in, we are forced to accept to work  under conditions that are not legally defined or guaranteed. Based on our own situation, we pose questions about our working and living situations: about the price of our work, the possibilities of a working space, working hours, health and social insurance, etc. To what extent are vague conditions and “contracts” prevalent – those based on dependence, flexibility, uncertainty , conditionality, blackmail and exploitation? What is also quite noticeable is a lack of public debate on the above issues.  Additional areas of concern include the marginalisation of critical artistic production; the abolition of undesirable  cultural institutions; the practices of censorship and autocensorship in cultural production at various levels; the suspension of autonomous initiatives and spaces; non-transparent redistribution of budgets; as well as the concentration of power within the ruling political party framework. These are only some of the problems facing those employed in the sphere of culture today. However, one of the key  issues, it seems, are the new forms of exploitation of labour in the fields of culture as in all spheres of  social production. Such contemporary capitalist system increasingly views culture as a field for achieving economic gains. Aggressive promotion of the concepts of creative class, creative industry and creative cities as part of the neoliberal deregulation, over and  exploit  various  social  goods such as public sector, public resources, public knowledge. By transferring matrices from developed capitalist countries, Serbia’s implementation of cultural policy has actively contributed, over the last few years, to establishing a relationship of domination and subordination, which ultimately places cultural employees in an impossible position. The programme From Creative Work to Creative City takes the form of a two-day seminar. Through lectures and discussions, we shall review the observed problems pertaining to the conditions in which we all live, learn and work today. Kontekst at the local community represents a continuation of our struggle for an autonomous space that began after we ceased to work on the site of the “Stari grad” Cultural Centre in October 2010. This struggle is  a self-organised pressure on the network of exploitation of contemporary art and culture, and will contribute to the development of different  relations of production in which the art would be are-politicised place of conflict as a driver of a new social relations. The process of research and communication with various administrative structures in the sphere of local cultural policy, resulted in signing a contract with the Municipality of New Belgrade that provided us with the opportunity of continuing our work on the premises of New Belgrade’s “Students’ City” local community. The period of our work in the local community we will use  to create a platform  for autonomous education as a possibility for a  new knowledge and knowledge relating to such political activity. www.kontekst.rs https://kontekstprostor.wordpress.com/
Friday, 14 October 2011
Yossi Atia (born in Jerusalem, Israel) lives and works in Tel Aviv. Atia is a video artist and film maker. Education: MFA in Directing and Production, Tel Aviv University's Film Department, Tel Aviv, Israel (2010), BA, Tel Aviv University's Literature Department, Tel Aviv, Israel (2007), Sam Spiegel Film & Television School, Directing and Production, Jerusalem, Israel (2004). Itamar Rose (born in Tel Aviv, Israel,1979) lives and works in Tel Aviv. Education: BA study Hebrew University (Philosophy, Economics, Political Science), Sam Spiegel Film School Studies (2005), Hebrew University Law School and Middle Eastern Studies (2007), Tel Aviv University Masters degree in Film Directing (2010). Selected Screenings of works : Pompidou Center and Palais de Tokyo, Paris; 39th International Film Festival Rotterdam, the Netherlands; Tate Modern, London; 303 Gallery, New York; Fact, Liverpool (2010). Recent group exhibitions : Haifa Museum of Art, Haifa, Israel; Bat Yam Museum, Bat Yam, Israel (2011), Erased Walls Mediation Biennial, Poznan, Poland (2010).   Darfur, 2008 video, 4,01 min Photography : Asher Ben Yair Courtesy of the artists Attia and Rose explore Israeli culture and identity. They ask questions, offer impossible scripts and touch on all the local open nerves until it’s hard to know if the tears you just shed were due to laughter or misery. In Darfur, Yossi Attia and Itamar Rose test how Israeli passersby would react if they were standing on the Egyptian border and had the power to decide whether to allow Sudanese refugees to cross the border or leave them on the other side and thus seal their fate. Yossi and Itamar's short film simulates the physical border, which must be traversed in order to comprehend the psychological borders in Israeli public opinion and their reaction to asylum seekers in Israel.  
Wednesday, 12 October 2011
Miklós Erhardt (born in Budapest, 1966) works in the overlaps between social, political and artistic fields. He has worked in the artistic collaboration Big Hope as well as making art individually and teaching, publishing and participating in various workshops. His recent shows include De Appel, Ludwig Museum-Budapest, Apex Art Gallery, Galerija SKC-Belgrade and Wiener Secession. Little Warsaw is the collective name for artists András Gálik and Bálint Havas as an umbrella unit for their collaborative activities. Little Warsaw have exhibited at the Venice Biennial, the Berlin Biennial, Stedelijk Museum, GFZK Leipzig, Apex Art Gallery.   Ship of fools, 2011 video stills, 30min Courtesy of the artsts   La nave dei folli (The Ship of Fools) is a project by Hungarian artist, Miklós Erhardt and the artistic duo, Little Warsaw. Erhardt’s Brechtian approach, and his focus on social issues such as homeless people, immigration and economic power-centres, is sometimes related to his research on historical symbols, monuments and their meaning in public spaces. These are also the main guidelines in the work of Little Warsaw. In 2002, local anarchists briefly occupied the Ex-Peterlini building (in a small town of Rovereto in South Tyrol), which had been abandoned for years. The event caused a stir among the local population and the authorities, launching a lengthy campaign for eviction of the squatters. All local and regional media were reporting on this development. Viewers follow a storyline which, in some parts, was expanded to a point where we can no longer tell whether what we see is a reconstruction of real events, or an artistic interpretation. Repetition of the past extends beyond the main message of this project.  
Friday, 14 October 2011
Imogen Stidworthy was  born in 1963 (UK).  She studied at the Jan van Eyck Academy in Maastricht. She has had many exhibitions worldwide including recent solo exhibitions at Matts Gallery London (2011), Kunstpavillon, Innsbruck (2010) Arnolfini, Bristol (2010) and Galerie Akinci, Amsterdam (2010), amongst others. Stidworthy has participated in many group exhibitions and biennials including Documenta 12, Kassel (2007), she was awarded with Liverpool Art Prize 2008 (winner) and made the artists exhibition project Die Lucky Bush at MuHKA, Antwerp (2008) . She is currently working on the second part of this exhibition project, In the First Circle, in collaboration with Paul Domela, at Fundacio Antoni Tapies, Barcelona (Oct 2011 - Feb 2012).   The Work v2.0, 2011 mixed media installation The Work v.02 raises questions about the capacity to communicate experience to one another and the function of memory both for the individual and those involved in an event from a distance. The artist composes fragments of a narrative into a coherent structure. This piece functions both on a visual as on an acoustic level: the strange combination of the quality of the sound and the confidence of the technology producing a renewed consideration of what we trust – ourselves or our machines.    
Friday, 14 October 2011
Nebojša Šerić – Šoba (born in Sarajevo, 1968), studied at the School of Applied Arts from 1983-1987, Academy of Fine Arts in Sarajevo  1989 - 1992. In 1999 he moved to Amsterdam to attend Rijksakademie, an international two-year artist residency and studio program. Nebojsa Seric – Shoba have been exhibited in Musee d’Art Moderne de la Ville, Paris; Jeu de Paume, Paris; Kunsthalle Bern,  Deutsches Hygiene Museum, Dresden, De Appel, Amsterdam,  Moderna Museet, Stockholm,  Creative Time, New York City, Exit Art, New York City, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, The 50th Venice Biennale (2003),  MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA, and P.S. 1, New York City. Šoba  currently lives in New York City.     Broadway Boogie-Woogie, 2006            clay, plaster, wood, foam, ready mades 15 x 63 x 76 cm Courtesy of the artist His artwork combines elements from different historical, political and social contexts, from and between which Šoba creates unexpected parallel stories and connections. He acts as a critic of the post-war political and social setting in Bosnia and Herzegovina, associating painful social issues with personal experiences – as such, the artist frequently appears as the main character in his work. The piece presented in this exhibition is a model the artist made more than a decade after the war ended. Šoba’s model serves as a memory of an event and as an idea never implemented, as a document which keeps the story alive. At one point during the war, Šoba proposed to his senior officers to arrange trenches on the frontline according to a Mondrian famous painting Broadway Boogie Woogie.
Thursday, 13 October 2011
Kiosk – Platform for contemporary art is independent art organization that creates exhibitions, publications and research projects with main aim to generate understanding about social problems, the theory and practice of contemporary art, and the role of art in mainstream culture. Kiosk collaborates with artists, cultural operators and the general public to create participatory projects and new networks that foster dialogue. Kiosk was founded in Belgrade in 2002 by Ana Adamovic (visual artist),  and Milica Pekić (art historian and curator). In 2008 Dorijan Kolundžija (visual artist), joined Kiosk team and in 2009 Paul Murray (theatre director and actor) and Svetlana Stojanovic (producer) also became part of organisation.
Thursday, 13 October 2011
Mladen Miljanović (born in Zenica, Bosnia and Hercegovina, 1981), completed the secondary school in Doboj. After the secondary school he attended the Reserve Officer School where he earned the rank of sergeant. Mladen Miljanović has based his art work upon his own life experience: on one hand it is the experience of growing up during the war and after war in the destroyed, impoverished, ethnically and territorially divided, and externally isolated country; on the other hand it is his formal education (at one stage of his education he attended the Reserve Officer School). The consequences of the war (work with the war invalids) and knowledge gained in the military school (use of senseless military “image vocabulary” in the new, art context), make the basic field of reference of Miljanović’s work as an artist. www.mladenmiljanovic.com     Do you intend to lie to me?, 2011 movie set photos, 14 min Photography : Drago Vejnović Courtesy of the artist and Ante Wachs Gallerie, Berlin   Miljanović began his career at an officers’ school in Banja Luka. After nearly a year, he changed his mind and decided to redirect his efforts into the field of art. For the purpose of the film, Do You Intend to Lie to Me? Miljanović used certain tactics to push the viewer into the world of brutal reality. Members of a special police unit stormed a cafe, arrested a man and escorted him to a police station in handcuffs, while the entire operation was monitored from above by helicopters. An interrogation ensues. Details of the suspect’s life are revealed with 26 questions. The audience feels as if they are standing on the other side of a one-way mirror in the interrogation room. They can hear the suspect’s replies, and are offered a brief look at the lie detector results. The social and political setting of the post-war Bosnian society, as well as the effects of wars which are manifested on the daily political scene, ethnic and religious divides and social instability, are constant elements in Miljanović’s performances, videos and installations.  
Thursday, 13 October 2011
Urtica, an art and media research group, specialises in the development of transdisciplinary projects that merge art, media, social science, and education. The group was founded in 1999 by Violeta Vojvodić and Eduard Balaž. In their work they combine traditional artistic disciplines and ICT.  Urtica was participated at numerous international festivals and exhibitions such as Ars Electronica in Linz, Austria, FILE  in Sao Paolo and Rio de Janeiro, Ogaki Biennial (2004), Hilchot Shchenim The Israeli Center for Digital Art in Holon, Israel, “Moirés” at Kunstraum der Leuphana Universität Lüneburg, Germany. Violeta Vojvodić-Balaž and Eduard Balaž are living and working in Novi Sad and Belgrade, Serbia. Urtica, art and media research group.   The Value Quest Bourse, 2011 http://valuequest.info installation, print, Internet platform The installation includes three segments: The Value is Here, The Art In Liquidation, The Indices of Fortune    
Tuesday, 11 October 2011
Damir Avdić, born in Tuzla in 1964, is the founder of the punk band Rupa u Zidu (A Hole in the Wall), with which he recorded five albums: Just Be Cool (Samo hladno, 1991), Just Keep the Distance (Samo budi na distanci, 1994), Love Me My Darling (1995), Good Night Patients (Laku noć pacijenti, 1996) and Kora (1999). He published solo albums Of Thorns and Stings (Od trnja i žaoka, 2004), The Dead are Dead (Mrtvi su mrtvi, 2008), Life is a Paradise (Život je raj, 2010). Avdić also published two novels: The Bridge on Blood (Na krvi ćuprija, 2005) i Enter Džehenem (2009). He wrote the music for the theatre performance Ein Kind unserer Zeit (Hamburg 2007/2008), directed by Branko Šimić, in which he also appeared as an actor. Avdić won the Farah Tahirbegović Award in 2008. His monodrama based on his novel Na krvi ćuprija was performed in Glej Theatre, Ljubljana, Slovenia (director Maret Bulc). In 2011 he wrote music for the documentary film The Total Gambit and fiction film Arheo, directed by Jan Cvitković.
Tuesday, 11 October 2011
Akram Zaatari (born in Lebanon, 1966) lives and works in Beirut. As co-founder of the Arab Image Foundation, Zaatari is deeply invested in examining how photography served to shape notions of aesthetics, postures and social codes, therefore looking at the present through a wealth of past photographic records from the Middle East. Zaatari has been focusing since 1999 on the archive of Studio Shehrazade in Saida (Lebanon) studying, indexing, and presenting the work of photographer Hashem el Madani (1928 -) as a register of social relationships and of photographic practices. Zaatari is author of more than 40 videos such as “Nature Morte” (2008), “In this House” (2005), This Day (2003), All is well on the Border (1997). A section of his work addressed sex practices among men in Lebanon’s current society, particularly in Crazy of You (1997) and How I love You (2001).   Nature Morte, 2008 Video, 11 min Courtesy of the artist and Sfeir Semler Gallerie, Beirut Akram  Zaatari's Nature Morte is a recording of a silent moment, in which two men prepare themselves for a military action. At the end, the older one leaves with a weapon on his shoulder, and the younger decides to stay. The video opens with the two seating in a dreary room. Nature Morte – a deliberately self-conscious montage of still images, current and archival footage from news broadcasts and propaganda films, as well as recorded interviews with former resistant fighters and prisoners – bears witness to multiple perspectives on the nature of resistance.
Friday, 07 October 2011
IRWIN is a collective of artists Dušan Mandič (b. 1954), Miran Mohar (b. 1958), Andrej Savski (b. 1961), Roman Uranjek (b. 1961) and Borut Vogelnik (b. 1959), which comprises one of the core groups within the artists’ collective Neue Slowenische Kunst (NSK). IRWIN was founded in 1983 in Slovenia. Recent exhibitions include: ZKM /Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe, State Museum of Modern Art, Moscow, MACBA, Barcelona (2011), Centre Pompidou, Paris,  The Israel Center for Digital Art, Holon, Israel (2010), Moscow Biennial, Red October, Museum of Contemporary Art (MACBA), Barcelona, Kunsthalle Krems,  Museum of Modern Art (MOMA),  Taipei Biennial, Taipei Art Museum (2008). The members of the group live and work in Ljubljana, Slovenia.   Back to USA, 1984 Installation view :  Galerija ŠKUC, Ljubljana (In the time of Back to USA project were Irwin members: Marko Kovačič, Dušan Mandič, Andrej Savski, Bojan Štokelj, Roman, Uranjek, Borut Vogelnik) photo: Barbara Borčić Courtesy of the artist In the past 30 years, Irwin has become the most recognisable groups of artists in Slovenia and abroad. The only thing left to add is that the group consists of five members, and that it was founded in 1983. The project “Back to USA” brings us new information about the group - information which could scarcely be found in books and a project previously unknown to the public. At the time the project was conceived, in 1984, the group did not include any of its (now famous) members. This year is important mainly because the Back to USA project is a recreation of an exhibition by the same name. A re-enactment of an exhibition coinciding with the original; copies of selected artworks made according to catalogue reproductions (because of their black and white reproduction, Irwin’s replicas of colour paintings or prints are also monochrome); the use of repetition as a reaction against contemporary cultural policies, or lack thereof – these are only the basic parameters of one of their first re-enacted projects of that period. The second revival, or the re-enactment of a re-enactment, prepared for the October Salon, also raises the issue of current cultural policies in former Yugoslav countries.  
Monday, 19 September 2011
Yael Bartana (born in Kfar-Yehezkel, Israel, 1970) lives and works in Amsterdam and Tel Aviv. She studied at the School of Visual Arts, New York (1999) and was an artist in residence at the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam (2000-2001). She represented Poland at the Venice Biennial of 2011 as the first non-Polish artist. She participated in the Sao Paolo Biennial (2010 and 2006), Documenta 12 in Kassel (2007) and the Istanbul Biennial (2005). Wild Seeds, 2005. two channel video and sound installation videoprojection, 6,39 min Soundtrack by Daniel Meir Courtesy of the artist and Annet Gelink Gallery Amsterdam   Wild Seeds was shot in the Palestinian occupied territories: in the beautiful mountainous landscape of the Prat region. The film is based on a simulation game called "Evacuation of the Gilad Farm Outpost" created by a group of young Israeli leftist activists (conscientious objectors for the most part) shortly before their Israeli Defence Force recruitment. Bartana’s video installation consists of two projections, one featuring an image (the aforementioned game), and the other – a text in English. Both are brought together by sound – the voice reverberating throughout the installation space of a female Reform cantor singing about the love of God.  Israeli society, as it emerges in Bartana's staged documentary-style films, is a nationalistic, patriotic society with a military-minded collective identity. These tendencies are made manifest in belligerent ritualism, as well as the appropriation of nature and religion into national iconography.  
Monday, 19 September 2011
Avi Mograbi, filmmaker and video artist. Born in Tel Aviv, 1956, lives in Tel Aviv. Director of: Details 11-13 (2009), Z32 (2008) (Venice film festival), Mrs. Goldstein (2006), Avenge but one of my two eyes (2005) (Cannes Film Festival), Detail (2004) (Berlin Film Festival), August (2002) (Berlin Film Festival), Wait, it’s the soldiers, I'll hang up now (2002), At the back (2000), Will you please stop bothering me and my family (2000) Relief (1999), Happy Birthday Mr. Mograbi (1999) (Berlin Film Festival), How I learned to overcome my fear and love Arik Sharon (1997) (Berlin Film Festival), The Reconstruction (1994), Deportation (1989).   Z32 Directed by Avi Mograbi, Appearing in Person Israel/France 2008, 35mm film, 81 min Courtesy of the artist and Doc & Film International Film Z32 focuses on a young, Israeli ex-soldier from an elite unit in the Isreali Defence Force, who confesses and reconstructs the killing event for his girlfriend and the viewers.This young man as anonymous confessor reveals the contradictions between a soldier’s adrenaline-driven experience of real combat and a civilian’s need for forgiveness. Can a film/could a cinema become a place of hiding for a war criminal? This is one of the questions that the film director is asking. Mograbi’s ingenious film, a self described “musical documentary tragedy,” leads us through a maze of national duty, admissions of guilt, desire for forgiveness and a soldier’s reality – issues rarely discussed in a public forum of this nature.
Monday, 19 September 2011
Darinka Pop-Mitić explores the relationship between history and the space of memory moving from bourgeois salons “decorated” by images of sites of mass killings from the latest Yugoslav wars to decrepit walls containing half-erased messages of solidarity with “The Third World”. Her objects and paintings thus constitute a trigger for souvenir involontaire, which reactualises the past for the viewer. Her recent exhibitions include: Austrian Cultural Forum, New York, Ground Floor America, Den Frie, Copenhagen, Denmark, Fondazione Puglisi Cosentino, Catania, Italy (2010), 50th October Salon, Circumstances, Belgrade, 11th International Istanbul Biennial, Istanbul (2009).     Two exhibitions on art and politics, 2011 Cartoon graphic novella, black and white Indian ink-and-brush, pencil on paper Courtesy of the artist The artwork of Darinka Pop-Mitić focuses primarily on the influence of cultural policies on writing and perception of past and present. Her objects and paintings thus constitute a trigger for souvenir involontaire, which reactualises the past for the viewer.  In the form of a comic book, the piece Two exhibitions on art and politics juxtaposes a number of artistic events – exhibitions organised in Serbia in the 1990s. Pop-Mitić’s main tools for research, archiving and interpreting what she sees as important exhibitions for a local art history, are the scarce documentation and photographs from these original events.
Monday, 19 September 2011

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